INS Form I-131 – U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Posted on August 19, 2013. Filed under: Immigration | Tags: , , |

USCIS Form I-131 is the application for a Travel document.

Sometimes the form is referred to as INS Form I-131 because, previously to the USCIS, the INS was the main agency in charge of immigration forms.USCIS replaced INS and began reviewing INS forms in 2003 after the creation of the Department of Homeland Security.

If you are a permanent resident or a foreign national living in the U.S., filing Form I-131 may be necessary in case you’re leaving the U.S. for a long period of time and wish to return without any problems with immigration and customs enforcement.

If you are a permanent or conditional resident and you are leaving the country for one year or more, Form I-131 will allow you to obtain a re-entry permit. This is necessary because if you stay outside the U.S. for one year or more, then USCIS may regard it as you abandoning your permanent residency. This may lead to you having to plea you case in front of a judge.

The re-entry permit would stop the USCIS from viewing your long stay out of the country negatively.

When filing for a re-entry permit, you must file at least 60 days before leaving the U.S. The re-entry permit is valid for two years from the date of issuance.

Form I-131 is also used to apply for two other types of travel documents beside the re-entry permit:

  • Advance Parole Documentto allow travel to people already inside the U.S. who wants to travel but has an adjustment of status application pending
  • Refugee Travel Document to allow travel outside the U.S. to people with refugee or asylum status
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What is INS?

Posted on May 23, 2011. Filed under: Immigration | Tags: , , |

The Immigration and Naturalization Services, also known as the I N S , was part of the United States Department of Justice. The INS was authorized to handle all the legal and illegal immigration and naturalization issues. The purpose of INS was to protect and enforce the laws of naturalization and handle the process of an individual becoming a citizen of United States. The INS was divided into three new agencies called USCIS (United States Citizenship and Immigration services), CBP (Customs Border and Protection), and ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement), all under the purview of the newly established Department of Homeland Security.

The USCIS administers all the immigration ins services including permanent residence, naturalization and other functions, CBP handles the border functions which include border patrol and ICE administers all the investigation, deportation and intelligence.

Immigration and Citizenship

Immigration INS is the process of a foreign individual moving into the United States to live on a permanent basis or for a temporary visit. Each individual who wishes to enter the country must seek permission to enter the country and abide by US immigration laws. The immigration law refers to the government policies that are used to mediate immigration to the United States. The USCIS performs many administrative services once carried out by the Immigration and Naturalization Services (INS).

An individual may become a US Citizen either at birth or after birth. If an individual is born in United States then he/she becomes a US Citizen automatically. If the individual is born abroad to US Citizen parents, then he/she may claim US Citizenship through their parents. If the individual is born outside US to non-US citizens, who have immigrated to United States, may obtain US citizenship through Naturalization.

Once the petition for immigration is sent to USCIS for processing, the USCIS will authenticate the eligibility of the applicant, and based on that evaluation, will either approve or reject the application. If the petition for immigration is approved by the INS, the applicant will be notified in writing. If the application is denied, the applicant will be notified in writing along with the reason for rejection.

Many people are welcomed into the United States every year and INS helps all eligible people to successfully integrate into American culture. One of the main processes that go through INS is the acquisition of US Citizenship. An individual is called a US citizen when he/she is a legal member of the United States. Being a US Citizen, the individual has rights to obtain Social Security number, receive retirement benefits and has right to vote. A US Citizen may obtain a US passport that allows them to travel to every country in the world. Also a US Citizen has the right to sponsor family members to enter the US legally and help them in obtaining a Green Card (Permanent Resident Card).

Source: What is INS

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INS – Immigration and Naturalization Service

Posted on May 14, 2011. Filed under: Immigration | Tags: , , , , |

The United States Immigration and Naturalization Service, also referred to as the INS, was a federal organization charged with the maintenance and enforcement of regulations applying to non-U.S. citizens entering the United States. INS and its predecessor organizations were involved in activities including detaining and/or deporting individuals who had entered the country illegally and adjudicating petitions for immigration and naturalization, as well as patrolling the borders of the United States. The origins of the INS stretch back to the end of the U.S. Civil War.

After a number of states had begun to enact their own immigration laws, the federal government recognized the need for a uniform set of immigration rules applied across the country. The adoption of this federal responsibility was followed by an immigration law passed by U.S. Congress in 1882 that gave the office of the Secretary of the Treasury the authority to monitor immigration and naturalization.

This authority was then transferred to the newly established Office of the Superintendent of Immigration with the passage of the Immigration Act in 1891. Under the Superintendent of Immigration, inspectors were stationed at U.S. ports and began to collect tax from immigrants. Ultimately, the responsibility for immigration in the United States would pass from the superintendent’s office through a number of other government agencies to become what was eventually known as the INS.

A number of unforeseen difficulties arose in administering the process of immigration and naturalization, and the focal point of these issues was Ellis Island. The island, located in New York harbor, had become the main entry point for immigrants to the United States. Unfortunately, by 1982 it had also been the center of a number of corruption and brutality scandals, which led President Theodore Roosevelt to appoint an attorney to resolve its difficulties.

By 1903, Congress had transferred responsibility for the Bureau of Immigration to the recently created Department of Commerce and Labor, reasoning that the primary concerns of immigration — protecting American workers and wages — fell under its jurisdiction. Congress further clarified the function of the bureau in the Immigration Act of 1924, which limited the number of immigrants that could be admitted into the U.S., assigning a quota to each nationality and issuing a limited number of visas on an annual basis. Entry was only permitted for immigrants in possession of valid visas.

The Bureau of Immigration, which later became immigration  INS, was transferred two more times before being disbanded in 2003. First it moved from the Department of Labor to the Department of Justice in 1940, a move ordered by President Franklin Roosevelt, and then INS was transferred from the Department of Justice to the Department of Homeland Security.

In its final incarnation, INS was headed by a commissioner who was appointed by the U.S. President. The commissioner worked with external agencies, including the United Nations, the U.S. Department of State, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and oversaw four interior divisions responsible for immigration and naturalization services. These divisions performed the duties of immigration enforcement, the operation of INS field offices within the U.S. and abroad, and the managerial functions of the agency.

The INS was dissolved in 2003, one year after it became part of the Department of Homeland Security. Its functions are now performed by other departments within the Department of Homeland Security, including U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcements (ICE), and U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP).

Source:  INS – Immigration and Naturalization Service

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Immigration INS

Posted on April 15, 2011. Filed under: Immigration | Tags: , , , , |

The Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) has not existed in eight years, having been dismantled and its responsibilities reassigned, yet many people still try to search for US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) by searching for “INS.”

The USCIS has posed the question on its official blog of why it may be that the organization received 30,000 searches for a government entity that has not existed since 2003. One theory is that “INS agents” are still an action movie archetype despite the demise of the agency, and another is that the INS was around for so long that people still haven’t gotten used to the change.

According to the San Diego Union-Tribune, the US federal government first began to address immigration in 1891 by appointing a Commissioner of Immigration within the Treasury Department. Responsibility for immigration matters changed hands several times before ending up in the control of the Department of Justice in 1940 under the INS, which was established in 1933.

After 63 years, responsibility for immigration matters was again reassigned, this time to the newly-formed Department of Homeland Security, and the INS was effectively broken into three organizations – USCIS, US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and US Customs and Border Protection (CBP).

http://www.immigrationdirect.com/immigration-news/

Amplify’d from www.immigrationdirect.com

The Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) has not existed in eight years, having been dismantled and its responsibilities reassigned, yet many people still try to search for US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) by searching for “INS.”

The USCIS has posed the question on its official blog of why it may be that the organization received 30,000 searches for a government entity that has not existed since 2003. One theory is that “INS agents” are still an action movie archetype despite the demise of the agency, and another is that the INS was around for so long that people still haven’t gotten used to the change.

According to the San Diego Union-Tribune, the US federal government first began to address immigration in 1891 by appointing a Commissioner of Immigration within the Treasury Department. Responsibility for immigration matters changed hands several times before ending up in the control of the Department of Justice in 1940 under the INS, which was established in 1933.

Read more at www.immigrationdirect.com

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What is INS?

Posted on September 24, 2010. Filed under: Immigration | Tags: , , |

The Immigration and Naturalization Services shortly called as INS was part of the United States Department of Justice. The INS was authorized to handle all the legal and illegal immigration and naturalization issues. The purpose of INS was to protect and enforce the laws of naturalization and handle the process of an individual becoming a citizen of United States .The INS established three new agencies called USCIS (United States Citizenship and Immigration services), CBP (Customs Border and Protection),  and ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement).

The USCIS administers all the immigration services including permanent residence, naturalization and other functions,  CBP handles the border functions which include border patrol and ICE  administers all the investigation, deportation and intelligence.

Immigration and citizenship

Immigration INS is the process of a foreign individual moving into the United States to live on a permanent basis or for a temporary visit. Each individual who wish to enter the country must seek permission to enter the country and abide by the immigration law. The immigration law refers to the government policies which handles the immigration to the United States. The USCIS performs many administrative services carried out by the Immigration and Naturalization Services (INS).

Citizenship:

Many people are welcomed into the United States every year and INS administers all the eligible people to successfully integrate into American Civic Culture. One of the main category administered for immigration through INS is US Citizenship. An individual is called a US citizen, when he/she is a legal member of the United States. Being a US Citizen , the individual has rights to obtain Social Security, receive benefits on retirement and has right to vote and choose a government. A US Citizen may obtain a US passport with which he may travel to every country in the world. Also the US Citizen has the right to sponsor his/her family to enter US legally and help in obtaining Green Card / Permanent Resident Card. Those individuals who seek for Immigration through INS must abide by the immigration laws .

An individual may become a US Citizen either at birth or after birth. If an individual is born in United States then he/she becomes a US Citizen automatically. If the individual is born abroad to US Citizen parents, then he/she may claim US Citizenship through parents. If the individual is born outside US to non- us citizen, who has immigrated to United States may obtain US citizenship through Naturalization. Naturalization is a process where permanent residents of at least18 years of age who meets all the eligibility requirements file for citizenship. If a person wishes to become a citizen of United States he/she must determine through which category he is able to file for US Citizenship.

Once the petitions for immigration is sent to USCIS for processing, the USCIS will check for the eligibility with inclusion of the supporting evidence. The approval of the immigration petition will be determined by the eligibility of the applicant. Once petition for immigration through INS is approved applicants will be notified in writing. If the application is denied, the applicants will be notified in writing the reason for rejection.

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ACLU: Ignore Cuccinelli on immigration inquiries

Posted on August 6, 2010. Filed under: Immigration | Tags: , , |

By Olympia Meola | TIMES-DISPATCH STAFF WRITER

Richmond, Va. —

The ACLU of Virginia yesterday urged law enforcement agencies to ignore Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli’s opinion on their power to inquire about immigration status, while opponents of illegal immigration pushed for more severe action.

Del. Robert G. Marshall, R-Prince William, who sought the opinion that Cuccinelli issued last Friday, sent a letter yesterday to all Virginia sheriff’s offices to encourage them “to do all that you can” using the powers described in the opinion to root out gangs.
Continue reading at www2.timesdispatch.com

Related Links

» Link: TOPIC: Ken Cuccinelli
» Link: PDF: Immigration Letter

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