Archive for May, 2011

What is INS?

Posted on May 23, 2011. Filed under: Immigration | Tags: , , |

The Immigration and Naturalization Services, also known as the I N S , was part of the United States Department of Justice. The INS was authorized to handle all the legal and illegal immigration and naturalization issues. The purpose of INS was to protect and enforce the laws of naturalization and handle the process of an individual becoming a citizen of United States. The INS was divided into three new agencies called USCIS (United States Citizenship and Immigration services), CBP (Customs Border and Protection), and ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement), all under the purview of the newly established Department of Homeland Security.

The USCIS administers all the immigration ins services including permanent residence, naturalization and other functions, CBP handles the border functions which include border patrol and ICE administers all the investigation, deportation and intelligence.

Immigration and Citizenship

Immigration INS is the process of a foreign individual moving into the United States to live on a permanent basis or for a temporary visit. Each individual who wishes to enter the country must seek permission to enter the country and abide by US immigration laws. The immigration law refers to the government policies that are used to mediate immigration to the United States. The USCIS performs many administrative services once carried out by the Immigration and Naturalization Services (INS).

An individual may become a US Citizen either at birth or after birth. If an individual is born in United States then he/she becomes a US Citizen automatically. If the individual is born abroad to US Citizen parents, then he/she may claim US Citizenship through their parents. If the individual is born outside US to non-US citizens, who have immigrated to United States, may obtain US citizenship through Naturalization.

Once the petition for immigration is sent to USCIS for processing, the USCIS will authenticate the eligibility of the applicant, and based on that evaluation, will either approve or reject the application. If the petition for immigration is approved by the INS, the applicant will be notified in writing. If the application is denied, the applicant will be notified in writing along with the reason for rejection.

Many people are welcomed into the United States every year and INS helps all eligible people to successfully integrate into American culture. One of the main processes that go through INS is the acquisition of US Citizenship. An individual is called a US citizen when he/she is a legal member of the United States. Being a US Citizen, the individual has rights to obtain Social Security number, receive retirement benefits and has right to vote. A US Citizen may obtain a US passport that allows them to travel to every country in the world. Also a US Citizen has the right to sponsor family members to enter the US legally and help them in obtaining a Green Card (Permanent Resident Card).

Source: What is INS

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What is the USCIS?

Posted on May 14, 2011. Filed under: Immigration | Tags: , , , , |

The Unites States of America is often described as a “Melting Pot”. People from all over the world immigrate here in search of a better life for themselves and/or their families. Others come here seeking an advanced education at our colleges and universities. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is the federal agency assigned in overseeing the lawful immigration of foreign nationals who are temporarily or permanently settling in the United States and is responsible for granting or denying immigration benefits to those individuals. But besides legal entry, the USCIS also tackles those that illegally enter the United States, making sure that those individuals do not receive benefits, such as social security or unemployment benefits, and investigating, detaining, and deporting those illegally living in the United States.

The Unites States of America is often described as a “Melting Pot”. People from all over the world immigrate here in search of a better life for themselves and/or their families. Others come here seeking an advanced education at our colleges and universities. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is the federal agency assigned in overseeing the lawful immigration of foreign nationals who are temporarily or permanently settling in the United States and is responsible for granting or denying immigration benefits to those individuals. But besides legal entry, the USCIS also tackles those that illegally enter the United States, making sure that those individuals do not receive benefits, such as social security or unemployment benefits, and investigating, detaining, and deporting those illegally living in the United States.

The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) was established on March 1, 2003 and is under purview of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). Before that date, the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) was responsible for all things related with immigration, including administrative and investigative functions. After the events of September 11, 2001, the U.S. Congress passed into law the Homeland Security Act of 2002, which led to the dismantling of the INS into three agencies within the DHS to enhance national security and improve efficiency: the US Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS), which is responsible for immigration service functions, such as those listed below; and the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and Customs and Border Protection (CBP) bureaus, which handle immigration enforcement and border security functions. The USCIS was briefly named the US Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services (BCIS), before becoming USCIS.

Unlike most other federal agencies, the majority of the USCIS’ budget (99%) comes from fees the USCIS collects from processing millions of immigration ins benefit applications and petitions annually.

Some of the services provided by the the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) are:

* Citizenship (Includes the Related Naturalization Process): Individuals who wish to become US citizens through naturalization submit their applications, such as the Form N-400, to the US Citizenship and Immigration Service. The USCIS determines eligibility, processes the applications and, if approved, schedules the applicant for a ceremony to take the Oath of Allegiance. The USCIS can help in determining the eligibility and provide documentation of U.S. citizenship for people who acquired U.S. citizenship through their parents by using Form N-600.

* Immigration of Family Members: USCIS also manages the process that allows current permanent residents and US citizens to bring close relatives to live and work in the United States by submitting forms such as the Form I-130.

* Working in the US: USCIS manages the process that allows individuals from other countries to come and work in the United States. Some of the opportunities are temporary, and some provide a path to a green card (permanent residence).

* Verifying an Individual’s Legal Right to Work in the United States: USCIS manages the system that allows participating employers to electronically verify the employment eligibility of their newly hired employees.

* Humanitarian Programs for Asylees and Refugees: USCIS administers humanitarian programs that provide protection to individuals inside and outside the United States who are displaced by war, famine and civil and political unrest, and those who are forced to flee their countries to escape the risk of death and torture at the hands of persecutors.

* Adoptions: USCIS manages the first steps in the process for US citizens to adopt children from other countries.

* Civic Integration: USCIS promotes instruction and training on citizenship rights and responsibilities and provide immigrants with the information and tools necessary to successfully integrate into American civic culture.

Source: What is the USCIS?

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INS – Immigration and Naturalization Service

Posted on May 14, 2011. Filed under: Immigration | Tags: , , , , |

The United States Immigration and Naturalization Service, also referred to as the INS, was a federal organization charged with the maintenance and enforcement of regulations applying to non-U.S. citizens entering the United States. INS and its predecessor organizations were involved in activities including detaining and/or deporting individuals who had entered the country illegally and adjudicating petitions for immigration and naturalization, as well as patrolling the borders of the United States. The origins of the INS stretch back to the end of the U.S. Civil War.

After a number of states had begun to enact their own immigration laws, the federal government recognized the need for a uniform set of immigration rules applied across the country. The adoption of this federal responsibility was followed by an immigration law passed by U.S. Congress in 1882 that gave the office of the Secretary of the Treasury the authority to monitor immigration and naturalization.

This authority was then transferred to the newly established Office of the Superintendent of Immigration with the passage of the Immigration Act in 1891. Under the Superintendent of Immigration, inspectors were stationed at U.S. ports and began to collect tax from immigrants. Ultimately, the responsibility for immigration in the United States would pass from the superintendent’s office through a number of other government agencies to become what was eventually known as the INS.

A number of unforeseen difficulties arose in administering the process of immigration and naturalization, and the focal point of these issues was Ellis Island. The island, located in New York harbor, had become the main entry point for immigrants to the United States. Unfortunately, by 1982 it had also been the center of a number of corruption and brutality scandals, which led President Theodore Roosevelt to appoint an attorney to resolve its difficulties.

By 1903, Congress had transferred responsibility for the Bureau of Immigration to the recently created Department of Commerce and Labor, reasoning that the primary concerns of immigration — protecting American workers and wages — fell under its jurisdiction. Congress further clarified the function of the bureau in the Immigration Act of 1924, which limited the number of immigrants that could be admitted into the U.S., assigning a quota to each nationality and issuing a limited number of visas on an annual basis. Entry was only permitted for immigrants in possession of valid visas.

The Bureau of Immigration, which later became immigration  INS, was transferred two more times before being disbanded in 2003. First it moved from the Department of Labor to the Department of Justice in 1940, a move ordered by President Franklin Roosevelt, and then INS was transferred from the Department of Justice to the Department of Homeland Security.

In its final incarnation, INS was headed by a commissioner who was appointed by the U.S. President. The commissioner worked with external agencies, including the United Nations, the U.S. Department of State, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and oversaw four interior divisions responsible for immigration and naturalization services. These divisions performed the duties of immigration enforcement, the operation of INS field offices within the U.S. and abroad, and the managerial functions of the agency.

The INS was dissolved in 2003, one year after it became part of the Department of Homeland Security. Its functions are now performed by other departments within the Department of Homeland Security, including U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcements (ICE), and U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP).

Source:  INS – Immigration and Naturalization Service

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How To Start the Green Card Renewal Process

Posted on May 12, 2011. Filed under: Immigration | Tags: , , , , |

This article provides information to help you determine if you need to renew your Green Card. It also explains the Green Card renewal process.

Amplify’d from www.immigrationdirect.com

How do I start the Green Card renewal process?

This article provides information to help you determine if you need to renew your Green Card. It also explains the Green Card renewal process.

What is a Green Card?

A Green Card, also called a permanent resident card, shows your proof of legal status as a permanent resident in the United States. It is a card about the size of a credit card and contains your photo as well as other information about you. As a permanent resident, you are required to carry your Green Card with you at all times. This card may also be referred to as Form I-551.

Read more at www.immigrationdirect.com

 

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Know Everything About Family Based Green Card Process

Posted on May 12, 2011. Filed under: Immigration | Tags: , , , , , , , |

Family immigration refers to the immigration of members of the family of a permanent resident or US citizen. This type of immigration happens on the basis of the person’s relationship to Legal Permanent Resident or US citizen. This relationship status is very important to determine the sponsor of a family member.

Amplify’d from www.immigrationdirect.com

Most US citizens and permanent residents want to bring their close family members to the country to live with them. However, this is not an easy process and involves a lot of complications. A Green Card is a work and residence permit given to an individual living in US legally. A family based Green Card is issued to an individual who is a relative of a Green Card holder or a US citizen. So, only a permanent resident or US citizen can sponsor his/her family member(s) get the residence and work permit in the US.

About Family Immigration

Family immigration refers to the immigration of members of the family of a permanent resident or US citizen. This type of immigration happens on the basis of the person’s relationship to Legal Permanent Resident or US citizen. This relationship status is very important to determine the sponsor of a family member. A US citizen can sponsor his/her spouse, children, parents and siblings but a Green Card holder can only sponsor his/her spouse and children who must be unmarried and must be below the age of 21. This suggests that if you intend to bring in your family members other than your spouse and children, then it is necessary that you should be a citizen of the US.

Read more at www.immigrationdirect.com

 

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