Archive for December, 2010

Immigration | Dual Citizenship | Immigrationdirect

Posted on December 28, 2010. Filed under: Immigration |

Dual citizenship is a term describing an individual who is a citizen of two countries at the same time. Multiple citizenship can also be held by an individual who is a citizen of three or more countries. However, all countries have their own laws regarding the recognition of multiple citizenship. Some countries recognize multiple citizenship, some do not, and some countries have no specific laws dealing with multiple citizenship.

Amplify’d from www.immigrationdirect.com

Dual Citizenship

Dual citizenship is a term describing an individual who is a citizen of two countries at the same time. Multiple citizenship can also be held by an individual who is a citizen of three or more countries. However, all countries have their own laws regarding the recognition of multiple citizenship. Some countries recognize multiple citizenship, some do not, and some countries have no specific laws dealing with multiple citizenship.

Read more at www.immigrationdirect.com

 

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When Do I Fill In The Green Card Renewal Application?

Posted on December 17, 2010. Filed under: Immigration | Tags: , , |

The green card renewal application becomes a part of the life of a permanent resident of the US. As a green card holder of the US, you can work and live in the US permanently. You need to make sure that you keep your green card updated using the green card renewal application.

Content:

As a green card holder of the US, you can work and live in the US permanently. Permanent resident card is a proof of being officially granted immigration benefits to live and work in the United States legally. Additionally, it qualifies you for US citizenship as permanent resident status is one of the main eligibility requirements for citizenship.

Form I-90 Application:

Generally, a permanent resident card is valid for ten years. On its expiry, you have to file Form I-90, the green card renewal application with the USCIS. If you have an expired green card, make sure you renew your card at the earliest. Though you will not be penalized for having an expired permanent resident card, nor will you lose your permanent resident status, it is in your best interests to get it renewed. Your permanent resident status in the US does not expire. Per US immigration laws, you should carry evidence of your status (a valid, unexpired green card or temporary passport stamp). If you do not renew your expired / expiring card, you may have difficulties in getting employment, other benefits and re-entry into the United States from abroad. Ensure that you apply for your new green card before you travel and have with you on any trip the temporary documentation you received. After traveling abroad, if you try to re-enter the US with an expired green card, you may experience unavoidable delays during the inspection process at the port of entry.

Also note that employers hiring you will not accept an expired LPR to verify employment authorization for new hires. You can use other documents that you will find on the Form I-9 (Employment eligibility verification form) such as a social security card and a driver’s license or have temporary evidence of status, such as an I-551 stamp or even the receipt notice for your Form I-90, Application to Replace Permanent Resident Card.

A conditional resident should not be mistaken for a permanent resident. A conditional resident will get an LPR card that will be valid for two years only. You have to get the conditions removed during the 90 days period before the card expires and this card cannot be renewed. The conditions must be removed else you will lose your conditional resident status. You have to file Form I-751 to remove the conditions. Once conditions are removed, you will be issued a permanent resident card that will be valid for the next ten years.

Per the USCIS, if your Permanent Resident Card has less than six months of remaining validity, you must renew your card before filing an application for naturalization. A copy of the unexpired green card should be submitted with the application for Naturalization.

After you send your completed LPR card renewal application to the USCIS, within 30 days you will receive an Application Receipt Notice with a 13-character number. This Receipt Notice is the acknowledgement that USCIS has received your application and that it is being processed. You can use the 13-character number on the receipt to check the status of your application while it is pending. The USCIS will also notify you about the fingerprinting appointment and subsequently, your interview date with instructions related to the supporting documents you should bring. The entire green card renewal application process approximately takes three months.

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Posted on December 15, 2010. Filed under: Immigration |

Immigration Resources http://bit.ly/fT5Mjm

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Immigration Resources

Posted on December 15, 2010. Filed under: Immigration |

Valuable list of immigration resources. Provides Immigration dictionary and glossary translates important USCIS (INS -) terms for you to understand any immigration process

Amplify’d from www.immigrationdirect.com

Index of Immigration Resources

Green Card

Immigration Doctors

Read more at www.immigrationdirect.com

 

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When Can I File Form N-600?

Posted on December 10, 2010. Filed under: Immigration |

You can become a US citizen either by birth or through naturalization.  If you were born in the US, you automatically become a citizen of the US.  Naturalization is a process where a person not born in the US becomes a citizen voluntarily.  Children born outside US to US citizen parents can claim US citizenship through their parents’ status subject to certain requirements.  This also depends on the laws in effect at the time the child was born.

If you were born in the United States, you can just apply for a US passport as a proof of your citizenship status in the US.  You need to file Form N 600, the citizenship application, if you want to document your US citizenship status based on your parent(s)’ status as US citizen(s).  To be eligible to file Form N 600, the citizenship application, it normally requires a combination of at least one parent being a U.S. citizen when you were born and having lived in the U.S. or its possessions for a given period of time.  Additionally, children born outside the US may become citizens after birth based on their parents’ citizenship or naturalization depending on various factors.

As mentioned earlier, you can automatically become a U.S. citizen if you meet certain conditions.  You should be under the age of 18 and at least one parent of yours should be a U.S. citizen, whether by birth or naturalization.  You should reside in the United States in the legal and physical custody of your U.S. citizen parent subject to lawful admission for permanent residence.
Additionally, to qualify as a “child” for purposes of getting a certificate of citizenship through parents’ status, you should not be married.  Also, if you were born out of wedlock, you should be “legitimated” while under the age of 16 and while in the legal custody of the legitimating parent.  However, a stepchild who was not adopted will not qualify as a “child” under this section.  If you satisfy these requirements before turning 18, you automatically obtain US citizenship without having to file an application.  However, to get a  certificate  of citizenship from USCIS, you must file Form N 600, the certificate of citizenship application.
Per the Child Citizenship Act, individuals who were age 18 or older on February 27, 2001 are not qualified for citizenship. One who was over the age of 18 as on February 27, 2001, may be qualified to apply for a citizenship certificate under the law in effect before the enactment of the Child Citizenship Act.
Also, biological or adopted children who regularly reside outside of the United States may qualify for citizenship.  However, you must meet certain requirements to get one.  At least one parent of yours should be a U.S. citizen or, if deceased, the parent was a U.S. citizen at the time of death.  Per the law, your US citizen parent should have been physically present in the United States or its outlying possessions for at least 5 years, at least two of which were after reaching the age of 14.  And of course, you should be under the age of 18 years.  Additionally, you should be residing outside of the United States in the legal and in the physical custody of the U.S. citizen parent and finally you are temporarily present in the United States after having entered lawfully and maintaining lawful status in the US.

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Applying For A Travel Document With The Form I 131

Posted on December 3, 2010. Filed under: Immigration | Tags: |

There are many a times when we are required to take a quick trip outside the United States for personal or emergency reasons. It is of great importance that all our paperwork related to our travel is in place. This way we will not face any trouble while coming back in. Lets now check what needs to be done to ensure an exit and safe return to the United States.

If you plan to take a trip outside the United States of America for more than year but less than two years in duration, then a re-entry permit will be required for getting readmitted. To apply for a re-entry permit you should file Form I 131.

Form I 131 can be used by those people who are green card holders. The form I 131 is primarily used by permanent residents who are required to be in the U.S. when filing it and must appear for the bio-metric appointment before they can embark on their trip.

The form I 131 is used to request for a travel document. The application for advance parole may be filed concurrently with the form I 485. The application for advance parole may also be filed at a time when the form I 485 is pending. The application for advance parole can be filed at the same service center as the form I 485. As a general rule, applicants who have lived in the U.S for more than 180 days without legal status cannot apply for Advance Parole as they will be ineligible to reenter the United States for either three or ten years even with an Advance Parole Document.

It is best if the applicant waits till his form I 131 application is approved before departing the United States of America. The processing time may vary but it generally ranges from three to six months. The travel document filed with Form I 131 is valid for one year and can be renewed.

The Form I 131 can also be prepared to apply for a refugee travel document. This application should be made in the United States. However, if you are a refugee, you can depart the U.S before the application is approved and may pick up the travel document at a United States Consulate or DHS office overseas. As an alternative, the applicant can also remain in the United States till the application is approved and then pick the travel document from a consulate or DHS office overseas. The processing time for a refugee travel document varies but it generally ranges from three to six months and is valid for one year. To qualify for an a Refugee Travel Document the applicant must be holding a refugee or asylee status and the general rule is that the applicant cannot file for a refugee travel document to travel to a country were he might fear persecution.

The re-entry permits are generally valid for two years and are not renewable. However the applicant may return to the United States to file for another permit. The general thumb rule is that the green card holder can spend almost six years outside the United States and retain a re-entry permit. Longer absence would require an application for Special Immigrant.

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Immigration | What is the price of intolerance? At least $140M

Posted on December 1, 2010. Filed under: Immigration |

A recent report, commissioned by the Center for American Progress, and conducted by the Scottsdale-based economic firm, Elliott D. Pollack & Co. revealed that Arizona has lost $140 million in revenue since the passage of the controversial immigration law, SB-1070.

Amplify’d from www.immigrationdirect.com

A recent report, commissioned by the Center for American Progress, and conducted by the Scottsdale-based economic firm, Elliott D. Pollack & Co. revealed that Arizona has lost $140 million in revenue since the passage of the controversial immigration law, SB-1070. The law makes failure to carry immigration documents a crime. It also extends the authority of police to detain anyone suspected of being in the country illegally.

Read more at www.immigrationdirect.com

 

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Posted on December 1, 2010. Filed under: Immigration |

Immigration | What is the price of intolerance? At least $140M http://ping.fm/92yx6

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